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Watch This: Hugo

There’s a reason Scorsese’s film Hugo picked up Oscars for Cinematography, Art Direction, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing, and Visual Effects last weekend. I can’t recall seeing such stunning visuals since Inception and Big Fish. Some of my friends seem put off that Scorsese has created a “children’s film,” but really take it for what it’s worth: a beautiful heart warming story.

The film, based on the book The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick in which after the death of his father (Jude Law), and disappearance of his uncle (Ray Winstone) young orphaned Hugo (Asa Butterfield) lives in a train station in Paris. His father had fixed clocks and other items, and Hugo grew up learning from him. Unbeknownst to the shopkeepers and inspectors of the station, Hugo uses the skills he’s learned to run the clocks in the station. From the beginning he is at odds with a crochity old man Georges Méliès (Ben Kingsley) who steals his notebook. He’s determined to get it back, and solve the puzzle of the robot gadget that is the last remaining link to his father. Along the way he becomes friends with the marvelous Isabelle (Chloë Grace Moretz) who is  Georges’s god-daughter. We follow Hugo and Isabelle on their adventures, as they build a fantastic friendship and learn about the purpose each of us has in life, and how these purposes are what make us tick, help us stand apart, and keep us going.

It’s a delightful story that had me in awe with its beauty and brilliance. Hugo and Isabelle captured my heart. I don’t know why I delayed watching this for so long, but if you haven’t seen it yet, give it a chance and check it out this weekend!

(If you missed it, here’s the theatrical trailer.)

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4 thoughts on “Watch This: Hugo”

  1. I too enjoyed Hugo, but the music drove me mad. After the third refrain it struck me that the soundtrack was stolen from (none other than your previous blog’s) Crowded House. I challenge you to watch Hugo again without thinking “Somewhere deep inside…” every time the strings start up.

  2. So funny that you would mention this right after my previous post. I will definitely have to pay attention more closely the next time I watch Hugo! I think I was so wrapped up in the storyline, that kind of passed me by.

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