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Watch This: May It Last

78dec2d0ddd91b437ce46410b79e6f6cMy oh my, I don’t even know where to start with the Judd Apatow’s incredible documentary on The Avett Brothers, May It LastWhen it was first announced that the film would have a one night showing in theaters nationwide, prior to the release of the film on HBO in January, I was still living in Florida. The closest theater playing it was about two hours away, and it was a Tuesday. I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to swing that, but the temptation was real. Well, I moved to Nashville Labor Day weekend, so it turned out that I was lucky enough to be about fifteen minutes from a theater playing it last week. From reading tons of posts of praise across social media, I knew I was in for something special, but I wasn’t prepared for how amazing it was. As a viewer in the audience, it felt like these people invited you into their homes (well, they did literally,) and gave such an intimate glimpse into their lives. The rawness and realness that is portrayed in the film is just something entirely unique. I have chills just trying to write about it. There are so many scenes in the film that made me love them even more than I did, prior to seeing it.

When Scott and Seth’s mom talks about how Scott didn’t trust her supervision skills of Seth when they were younger, and had an irrational fear of him being kidnapped and would insist on accompanying them anywhere. The boys talking about when Scott when off to college, they would record song ideas on one another’s voicemails, and mail cassette tapes back and forth. Finding out that Bob played for them in a parking lot, and basically did not have prior stand up bass experience! (Um, wow.) The emotional discussion of Hailey’s health journey after being diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor and the way the whole crew rallied around one another. Them talking about how that was a real moment of figuring out faith, deciding what they believed. Seth and Jennifer talking about becoming parents. The discussion of divorce. The poignant moments following the recording of “No Hard Feelings” and the discussion of the elephant in the room. The emotion in that scene was so intense, that it almost seemed palpable. I almost felt uncomfortable as if we were seeing something we shouldn’t have permission to see because it was such a vulnerable conversation.
The scene where the boys are working through the lyrics to “Wish I Was” was  one of my most absolute favorite moments of the film. It was incredible to see how this stream of poetry just falls from their mouths in literal seconds. Their ability to bounce ideas off of one another and make it work so seamlessly is incredible. Following the transition from this scene, you could hear whispers throughout the theater. I have a feeling it was over the awe inspiring brilliance of the moment. I mean, Seth and Scott Avett are both masters of the craft but it was so intriguing to watch how obviously this is what they were born to do, music is the language that they speak.
There’s a time early on in the film where Scott is being interviewed as he drives. He discusses how growing up, and to this day, they all just thought that everyone would want to know their feelings on things, that they were supposed to share them, and that people wanted to hear them. That’s just the way they operated. (In that moment, I felt a sense of kindred spiritness. I mean, hey…that’s probably why I write this blog because I have an innate need to share my thoughts and feelings on the things I care about.)
One of the coolest parts of the film to me, was that person after person in one-on-one interviews, (so not overhearing someone speak it before them) touched on how special the relationship between Scott and Seth is, and that they don’t see brothers who have that connection like that often. Plus, the fact that they can work together the way that they do. This was extended to what an experience it is to work with the band, and how close and cohesive everyone is as a whole. Key terms that kept being repeated were the kindess, respect, and love shared across the board.
I think fans of The Avett Brothers have caught on to this because it’s obvious there’s something extremely special about this group of people. If you’ve ever seen them live, then you know they are literally opening their hearts up on that stage, and pouring it out. But the really cool thing is that now the rest of the world can see what makes this group so unique.
When watching May It Last, it’s not like “oh this will be a cool movie to see” it’s more like a journey or experience you are taking, or joining in. As soon as the film ended, I thought to myself “I can’t wait to see that again.” (Funny enough that’s the exact same reaction I have every time one of their concerts comes to a close. It’s why people travel across the country and see them play three nights in a row.) This film made me laugh and cry, and I can’t tell you how many times I caught myself grinning from ear to ear as I stared up at the screen (that was if my mouth wasn’t hanging open in awe over whatever new thing surprised me.)
PS: Encore dates have been added at certain theaters, so check out the list and see if there’s a showing near you!
(If you’re not convinced yet, you can check out the trailer below!)
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Read This: We Are Okay by Nina Lacour

It had been quite a while had been quite awhile since I’d read anything by Nina Lacour when I picked up We Are Okay. I’d seen a lot of positive feedback on Twitter, so I figured I’d give it a shot. Let me tell you, I was not prepared for the emotional journey it took me on. I read it on a hot summer day in Florida, melting by the pool. At one point, I couldn’t tell if I was sweating or crying (not kidding, it was feels like 103 that day.) This is such an emotionally stirring story.

The book begins with young college student Marin, preparing to stay in the dorms alone in NYC while her school shuts down for winter break. The groundskeeper is the only other human, close by. We don’t yet know why Marin is staying there, or who Mable who might be coming soon, is. Well, soon we learn.
This is one of those books that I think is best to read without having a whole big overview, going into it. It’s better to just let the story unfold itself sometimes.
Instead of a plot summary, I’ll share some of the basic takeaways from this story. We’re reminded that people aren’t always who we think they are, that each of us has our own demons we fight everyday, that family doesn’t have to be someone we’re related to by blood, or can connect the branches on a family tree. We’re reminded how strong the bonds of friendship can be, that sometimes, even if we’d rather shut the whole entire world out, that those bonds can be an immense link to something that will feel like it’s reviving you when you’re drowning – a life preserver of sorts.
We’re reminded that you don’t always have to disregard your entire past to move forward. It’s possible to use those experiences to shape and grow who you will become.
Marin experiences quite the personal journey of growth in this story. She begins to learn healthy ways to navigate grief, she recognizes the importance of keeping close those who truly know and love you, and she fights to get to the point where she’s not just surviving, but she’s ok.
This is not a light hearted read, by any means but I think it’s a special story. By the end, I was in tears. It’s a quick read, partially because of length, but also because the vague details near the beginning will make you want to turn the pages faster to get the full idea of everything going on. Check it out!
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Listen to This: “Praying” by Kesha

First of all – Happy Friday everyone! Second of all – I apologize for the lack of frequent posts recently. Things have been a little crazy over here, but I have a few things in mind I’d like to share with you. One of them being Kesha’s “Praying.” The whole Rainbow album is hands down – fantastic. But there is something extremely special about this song in particular. “Praying” was released in July, and I’ve been meaning to blog about it for a bit. The first time I heard it, I got chills and started crying. I’ve yet to listen to it, without tears coming to my eyes.My top adjective to describe this song? Powerful. Kesha is a powerful force, as a human, with her art, with her strength. I keep thinking about the metaphor of a Phoenix rising from the ashes. But really…Here we have this woman who has been through the ringer, and a lot of it in the public eye. I read an interview the other day where she talked about her time in in-patient rehab for her eating disorder, and how her time with the piano when she worked on Rainbow, she kept singing it to herself to get her through. I know music has an entertainment value, but it’s also an extremely influential tool in spreading your message. It’s amazing that someone who could’ve let her first single in years be fueled with rage and hate – yet…I think this is a song of grace. This woman has found peace. Can you hear the honesty in her voice? Do you hear the vulnerability? Because I think it’s all there. But I also think this is someone who has been through hell (as the lyrics referenced,) and has come out on the other side…though all of our experiences shape us as people, she seems to have evolved and come out on top despite the ultimate attempts to drag her to to the bottom. “We both know all the truth I could tell” Kesha sings. Light has been shed on parts of her battle, but I’m sure there are countless details we will never know. I just really believe in the raw authenticity of this song. It’s like an anthem – an anthem for those who have struggled with all kinds of traumatic experiences. Abusive relationships, mental illness, assault, the crappy cards we get dealt in life sometimes. I just think the message here can really resonate with listeners, and I have so much respect for Kesha for using her voice, her unmistakable talent to create this. In a time when others create “revenge” songs. Here we have this woman speaking her truth, and she’s doing it with poise. This song in itself shows such an evolution from the artist who brought us “Tik Tok.” When I think of Kesha, and I think of her art, her strength, her courage, her ability to be so real I just feel so proud of her. That probably sounds weird coming from someone who doesn’t personally know her, but she’s shared enough of her story with us to know that she’s come out on the other side of a very dark time, and she is glowing.

meg says watch this, Watch This

Watch This: Gifted

I have barely gone to the movie theater in 2017, but there was one movie I saw the trailer for several months prior to its release, I just knew I wasn’t going to miss. Gifted starring Chris Evans, McKenna Grace, and also included Jenny Slate, Octavia Spencer, and Lindsay Duncan in this incredible cast. I tend to go to the movies by myself, but this one I saw with my parents, and it was great to know I wasn’t the only one that went through several tissues during this drama. McKenna Grace plays Mary, a spunky, spirited, brilliant little girl being raised by her Uncle Frank (Chris Evans) in Florida. Frank unfortunately gets into a custody battle with his mother, but it’s not any usual custody battle – Evelyn wants Mary because she’s basically a child prodigy and she wants to exploit her abilities. Jenny Slate plays Bonnie, Mary’s teacher who recognizes her unmistakable talent, but also gets Frank’s desires for Mary to have as normal a childhood as possible. The film is just beautifully done.  You can tell that the cast seriously bonded with one another, and the chemistry is so palpable, I forgot that all of these characters aren’t related to one another in real life. (Isn’t that the goal of a film – make the whole story undoubtedly real?) I really loved the message in this story too. Frank so badly wanted Mary to really get the chance to be a kid. I won’t ruin the story, but it explores plenty of themes – the value of family, finding balance in life, figuring out ways to acknowledge a gift but not make life ever be about only one thing. The soundtrack was amazing, the cast was astonishingly talented, the story was beautiful and it’s funny but some of the parts that made me sob in the theater weren’t even “sad” they were just so incredibly touching. I laughed, I cried, I got mad at characters, I thought about relationships and life, and the little things. I know I haven’t recommended a movie in a while, but if there’s one you’re going to add to your To Watch list, this should be it. The cast deserve some major awards for these performances!

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Listen to This: “Counting Blue Cars”

This morning, Dishwalla’s “Counting Blue Cars” came on the radio as I was driving to work, and I just came unglued. I’m a nineties kid. Of course I know the words by heart, and I knew what was coming, but when they got to

“Must have been late after noon
On our way, the sun broke free of the clouds
We count only blue cars skip the cracks in the street
And ask many questions like children often do”

I feel like it broke me a little bit. First of all, this song is a classic, secondly it lends itself to multiple interpretations (existentialism, philosophy, religious connotation, mental health, the whole shebang,) thirdly I think it’s a great jam. Also, sense of “community” has been heavy on my mind and heart and I feel like this song opened the flood gates somehow. I was thinking about our underground networks of communication. I was thinking how sometimes, distance doesn’t matter – kind words from someone near or far, can really touch our soul.. While in some situations, a tight bear hug would be much preferred, it’s no reason to shrug the extension of kindness through communication, or support in the form of an open ear, or someone that just attempts to understand, or those quiet “me toos.” There are so many ways we can reach out and hold someone’s hand in pain, metaphorically and literally. I was thinking about how pain, grief, and uncertainty are like sitting in a dark room.When we let someone in, when we open up, when we ease the weight of some of the load we carry by not hiding all these difficult emotions – it’s like a light coming on in that room. Maybe not the big overhead light flooding the room in a warm glow, but even a little dim nightlight in the corner that helps light the path. Sometimes, you sit in the dark room for so long it’s hard to remember that the light can seep back through the sliver of space under the door. My point is, we all need each other sometimes. Be kind, be open, be compassionate. This song also makes me think about child-like innocence, and that sting in a wound when we’re vulnerable, and also about how easily our perceptions are shaped when we’re young. Be the light in the dark room for each other, okay? And if you don’t know what song I’m rambling on about, or you just want to jam out to it today, listen to this: